Summer Academy 2017 to focus on meso organizations

In July 2017 we (mesopartner) will host the next annual Summer Academy. This year is special for me, because the theme of the event is about meso-organisations in the economy. Meso organizations are often taken for granted. And it is often assumed that leading or growing a meso organization is like managing a business or a project.

We believe these organizations, and especially their leaders, need some special attention.

For those that wonder what is meant with “meso”, it refers to a specific kind of organization or program that is created with the intent to overcome a whole range of market failures in an economy. Meso-organisations are known by their specificity, for instance to assist specific industries to modernize, or to support start-ups, or to promote investment in particular new technologies or a specific sub-national region. The reality is that while we describe their role in terms of market failure, competitiveness and growth, very often these organizations, their funders and even their clients have very little interest in theoretical concepts like market failure, systemic competitiveness, innovation systems or even modernization. They have a mandate, a limited budget, and many competing demands.

Most of my work is about helping leadership teams of meso organizations to make better sense of their context, to design better programs and services so that they can have a bigger effect on the industries they serve, or to become more resilient.

Increasingly our focus is on helping these organizations to become more innovative, not only in their product/service offerings, but in the way they unleash the creativity of their staff, their networks and how they all learn and discover what is possible in their given social and economic context. It is about stretching the capability, the influence and the adaptiveness of the meso.

More_Meso

To manage a meso organization takes a special kind of person.

  • Firstly, the leader must meet the demands of their funders or stakeholders. They must be able to handle a huge bureaucracy and lots of reporting on the often seemingly senseless of indicators and targets that funders require. Spare a thought for those that depend on several sources of funding.
  • Secondly, the leader must meet the demands of industries, clients, wanna-be entrepreneurs and dreamers that come knocking on their door. While we can collectively call these businesses “clients”, they are in fact a very diverse group with a mind numbing diversity of requirements, demands, capabilities and competencies. While in an industrialized country it is sufficient to work with those enterprises that shows the right kind of curiosity and willingness to pay for top notch external support, in developing countries these meso organizations are often under pressure to work with lagging enterprises that are struggling to master the basics, marginalized groups and must also contribute to all kinds of social objectives. It is not simply about being at the cutting edge and competitiveness, but also about creating pathways for others to follow. This is very hard to do when there are huge shortages of professional management in companies, poor schooling and a whole host of interconnected market failures that seems to hold everyone from reaching their full potential.
  • Thirdly, these leaders must contend with their organizational context. For instance, many meso organizations I work with are associated with research institutions or universities. That means there is a demand on these centers to contribute to the academic objectives of their host. This includes creating opportunities for students to gain work experience, providing post graduate support, procuring raw material and components and running a business through an administration designed for another purpose.

My list could go on. But perhaps at another time.

We’ve been developing tools, instruments and concepts targeted at meso organizations for more than 10 years. This year we will focus on these, without losing focus on promoting the healthy economies of territories and industries.

I am looking forward to the Summer Academy where we can explore these and other issues. Every year we attract a range of experts and practitioners from around the world where we learn together and get to explore issues that we face in the field with a combination of theory and practical simulations. I hope to see you there!

For more information, visit the Mesopartner Summer Academy page.

Recent Mesopartner Working paper on complexity theory and development

This article was originally posted by Marcus Jenal on the systemic-insight.com website in December 2013. I co-authored this paper with Marcus. It is an output of the theme of applying complexity theories to economic development.

For the last 3 years we at Mesopartner have been purposefully experimenting with complexity and systems theories in our practice. Not only did we change our company logo and strapline based on our new learning, we started to dismantle and question almost every aspect of our instruments, tools and theories.

This was a steep learning curve for us and for our key customers who agreed that we could embark on these serendipitous journeys together. While we still believe in bottom up development, we are wondering about how to achieve developmental change within the typical timelines and resource constraints that development projects often face.

One of the results of this process is this website (http://systemic-insight.com), where we want to share our thoughts and invite our followers to contribute to the discussions we have.

A new Mesopartner working paper now provides a theoretical grounding for the work we have done in the last three years and will continue to do. We consider some definitions, ponder the implications and try to formulate some responses to some of the key challenges that systems and complexity theories confront us with in our field of bottom up economic development.

We see this paper as an input into a broader discussion with our close collaborators, our close clients, and the broader network that we form part of. We ask  you to send us your thoughts and add your comments to this and future posts.

We thank the colleagues that have already commented on the paper. Many of the suggestions are already incorporated into this version. Your contributions are greatly appreciated. Shawn and Marcus

Some recent links I enjoyed

Take a look at the article by Andrea Cornwall in The Guardian on how donor policies fail to bring real and sustained change for women.

Also take a look at the blogpage of Marcus Jenal and one of my other favorite bloggers David Green (Oxfam). I assume that most of my readers are by now also subscribed to Aid on the Edge of Chaos by Ben Ramalingham (ODI). If you feel like a good laugh take a look at Ben’s post on the Genesis of Aid (a parody).

The thematic pages on Mesopartner.com that were recently updated. Also note that we still have a few limited openings at our Annual Mesopartner Summer Academy on Systemic Economic Change that will take place this year in Berlin from the 2nd to the 6th of July 2012.

Site update – complete list of publications now available

After the two earlier posts this morning I was asked if I could make my complete list of publications available. Thank you for the reminders!

I have added a new sub page on the left (main menu) with a list of the different kinds of publications I’ve been involved in. This includes books, reports and other publications.

For those that are interested in Mesopartner note that I have also updated the RALIS page on the Mesopartner site

Book announcement: Understanding Market Failures in an Economic Development Context

This is the long awaited book on Market Failures. The cover page illustration of the hard copy is by Lina Stamer and is an image that I use when I present the popular training session on how to address market failure in a practical way.

The book is available for free as a E-book, or a paperback edition can be ordered here. More books are available on the Mesopartner online bookstore.

The official description of this publication is:

Many development practitioners are familiar with the phrase “market failure”. However, not many people relate to the topic in a practical sense. Many remember boring lectures in universities where market failures were presented as abstract theoretical concepts in economics 101. In this book, Dr. Shawn Cunningham takes a perspective that the clues to begin to address market failures are in the world around us. He argues that the characteristics attributed to each market failure by clever scholars actually provide some clues to development practitioners about ways in which to address the imperfections that hinders market based transactions. Shawn also argues that market failures cannot be addressed by business management principles, and that typical market research instruments will provide little information on how to make a market system where there is demand, supply and supporting institutions work better

What do we mean with systemic?

There are hundreds of ways of describing the word systemic. Yet in development it is important that we at least narrow down the definitions as to not cause confusion.

Richard Hummelbrunner describes three emergent features of methods and approaches from systems thinking:

  • An understanding of interrelationships
  • A commitment to multiple perspectives
  • An awareness of boundaries

Richard then explains that each of these features focused in the development of the systems thinking field in the last fifty years. Up to the 60s, the focus was interrelationships. This was followed by an increasing awareness of the different perspectives as a critical issue. This affected the way people recognized interrelationships. In the 1980s the focus shifted towards the boundaries of the system, as practitioners realized that they system had to be bounded in some way to allow for diagnosis. This raised the ethical question of who decides what is part of the system and what is not, as the shifting of these boundaries has great influence on what is revealed and understood when the system is diagnosed.

Our firm, Mesopartner, is known for the “Systemic Competitiveness” framework that we use in our work. The framework originated within the German Development Institute in the mid 90s. One of the common misunderstandings about Systemic Competitiveness is that people confuse systemic with systematic. The latter in my mind would refer to a very detailed and exact way of understanding and doing things that may be very rigid. This may detract from the fact that to really understand a system we might have to embrace complexity, dilemmas and issues in a more dynamic way, something that a very recipe driven systematic approach may not allow.

Reference:

Williams, B and Hummelbrunner, R. 2010. Systems concepts in action: a practitioners toolkit. Stanford Business Books.

ESSER, K., HILLEBRAND, W., MESSNER, D. & MEYER-STAMER, J. 1995.  Systemic competitiveness. New patterns for industrial development. London: Frank Cas.

MEYER-STAMER, J. 2005.  Systemic competitiveness revisited. Conclusions for technical assistance in private sector development. Mesopartner

The benefits of being aware of how a system works

For those that have participated in any of the training events that I have contributed to in the last years would hopefully recall my favorite energizer called the Systems Game. In this game we simulate a complex system, with all the participants moving around trying to position themselves between two targets in the group, without the targets being aware who is chasing them. Things usually start of neat and tidy, but soon chaos breaks out.  After the game we reflect on the system and how to better understand its behavior, and also how to figure out how to stimulate change of behavior in the system.

The pictures below were taken in the last Mesopartner International Summer Academy on Economic Development.

The participants secretly determine who they will follow
The participants tries to become system aware – who is following me?

One of the first insights is that our job as practitioners is not to try and fix the system, nor to solve a problem on behalf of the system. Our first job is to try and get the system to become more aware of its own behaviors, issues and dilemmas. Very often this will allow us to use some of the existing relationships, routines and networks of the system to improve the performance or to address some issues in the system.

I received the following little e-mail story recently that actually shows how actors that are aware of the system can easier manipulate the system to achieve certain outcomes. From a few google searches I could not determine the source of the story, except to see that its been featured in many fora. Therefere if you know the original source then please let me know so that I can give proper credit.

Here is the story as I received in my e-mail:

An old man wanted to plant a tomato garden, but it was difficult work, as the ground was hard.

His only son, Vincent, who used to help him, was in prison, and so the old man wrote a letter to his son:
Dear Vincent,
I am feeling sad because I won’t be able to plant my tomato garden this year. I’m too old already.
I know if you were here,  you would happily dig the plot for me, like in the old days.
Love,
Papa

A few days later, he received a letter from his son.
Dear Papa,
Don’t dig up that garden. That’s where the bodies are buried.
Love, Vinnie

At 4 am the next morning, FBI agents and police arrived and dug up the entire area without finding any bodies.
They apologised to the old man and left.

That day, he received another letter from his son:

Dear Papa,
Go ahead and plant the tomatoes now. That’s the best I could do under the circumstances.
Love, Vinnie

Now the moral of this story is that only people that are aware of how a system might behave can fully exploit the system to their advantage. I wonder how we can use this insight to promote better inclusiveness in development? From my everyday work experience I know that in value chains and production systems the poor, weak, small and marginalized are often the least aware of how the bigger system(s) around them work. The powerful, better informed and more successful entrepreneurs often have better information at their disposal. While some of this information could be formal, quite a bit of it is qualitative based on a deeper understanding of how things (might) work.

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