Starting the innovation system series


The next few posts will be focused on my work in the last 18 months. I have dedicated a large part of my work into diagnosing and improving innovation systems in South Africa.

My perspective is quite unique, as I did not conduct these studies to develop national policy, but rather to assist intermediary organizations to take steps to improve the innovation systems that we diagnosed. What further differentiates my view is that we start our diagnosis with the private sector, and then work our way back to universities, technology intermediaries and other public sector organizations.

When I went down this road I thought that I had parted with my previous work on local economic development (which has been ruined in South Africa due to petty politics and misguided local government interventions). Little did I know that my previous experience in mobilising local stakeholders, trying to access national public sector programmes, and begging for a more responsive national stakeholders would remain so relevant in this exercise.

Many people ask me why I switched into a topic like Innovation Systems. It sounds so IT’ish. Well, it is far from that. My concern is with finding ways to build manufacturing industries and their supporting sectors from the bottom up (can we panic about the de-industrialisation in Africa, please?). My obsession is to figure out what can be done to get whole parts of an economy to upgrade technologically, without industry expecting governments to pay for everything. So basically, I am trying stimulate reflection and adjustment in  the manufacturing sector which includes their public and private supporters in the system around them. Also important is to equip the stakeholders in the system to reflect on the patterns around them, and to understand how they can change their own behaviour and how to actively shape the supporting environment around them.

I will close by saying that diagnosing a system around an industry is never a once off exercise. This is perhaps why so many development interventions don’t set change processes in motion that is re-inforcing and ongoing. Our biggest challenge is not to convince industries that they have to change, but to assist them to frequently reflect on their patterns of behaviour (even after we have left). We have to help industries to develop new habits of interaction (that adds value and this makes business sense), we have to strengthen local institutions to assist with strengthening signals of change and improvement (so that firms know that if they stop trying to improve they will fall behind). In the end it does not help that we understand their system, but that they understand their own systems.

The best part is that I get to work with real entrepreneurs, real scientists, real social change agents, and often really committed public officials. Real change without logframes and impact chains. Unfortunately we often also have to achieve this change with small budgets.

3 Responses to “Starting the innovation system series”

  1. Blog-Posts I liked « marcus jenal Says:

    […] Starting the innovation series […]

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  2. Is there a hierarchy of the different levels of innovation? « Shawn Cunningham's Weblog Says:

    […] they focus mainly on the micro level of the firm, and don’t move to the innovation system level. Moving from one firm to many is not necessarily systemic or […]

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  3. How to strengthen innovation – good practice vs. emergent practice | marcus jenal Says:

    […] This does not say that it is hopeless to introduce new technologies or stimulate innovation in a given context. But the approach needs to be different. Innovation cannot be driven from the outside, but needs to emerge from among the system actors based on what is already there. This does not mean that they cannot adopt a new technology from somewhere else, but it needs to be within reach of the actors, they need to be capable of handling it. An innovation systems approach focuses on the environment and how conducive it is for firms/farmers to solve their own problems individually, collectively or through cooperating with a technology intermediary (read more about innovation systems here and find a series of blog posts on innovation systems by Shawn Cunningham here). […]

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