Local economic development as an evolutionary process


Modern evolutionary economics is about 20 years old now, and many research programmes continue to add to the content of the subject. I think that development practitioners have a lot to learn from this subject. When we work at the local level, with local stakeholders and local resources, we are often confronted by the failures of traditional economic models (for instance the obsession with supply and demand). For instance, traditional economics often focus on distribution or allocation of wealth, while in evolutionary economics the focus is more on wealth creation. Traditional economic models assume that you can use the data of the past to make reliable predictions about the future. Just this simple insight will already change many LED approaches that emphasize working with the youth and the marginalised (solving an allocation problem) towards understanding the systemic interaction of economic technologies, social technologies and physical technologies that co-evolve to create wealth.

To be more precise, an economy should be recognised as a complex adaptive system (Beinhocker, 2007; Ramalingham, Jones, Reba and Young, 2008). This means that the economy is a system of interacting agents that adapt to each other and their environment in a complex way. Complex adaptive systems are sub-systems of open systems. It recognises that change and advancement are forces within the system created by the agents, and that it takes energy to create and process information, and to create order.

Dosi and Nelson (1994) explains that “evolutionary” implies a class of theories that tries to explain the movement or change of something over time. It furthermore involves both random elements which generate or renew some variables, as well as mechanisms that systematically create variation. Central to these theories are the concepts of deductive and experimental learning and discovery.

Beinhocker explains a simple formula that is common to all evolutionary systems. Firstly, a system needs to create variety (for instance through many innovators trying new things), and then there must be some selection or fitness criteria (often this is provided by markets). Next there is a selection process, where the ‘best’ or rather most-suitable designs are selected, and thereafter these choices are amplified or repeated (also known as imitated).

So if you think of your local economy, then consider how certain businesses came about. The variety of businesses is a direct result of novelty or variety creation, and how they ‘fit’ to the criteria of local consumers,resulting in these business models being ‘chosen’. Every now and then, a business person with a new or different idea comes along, and this in many cases may even result in local consumers changing their fitness criteria. This describes a process where economic resources (as well as labour and technology) are continuously being allocated to those who are able to combine or create new ideas, new products, and new business models.

In the next few posts I will try to delve deeper into this topic, as I believe that it holds many important insights to why local economies grow in such an unpredictable and dynamic way, and why so few local governments or organised business in Southern Africa struggle to have any real positive and leveraged effect on local economies.

References and additional reading:

BEINHOCKER, E.D. 2007.  The origin of wealth. Evolution, complexity, and radical remaking of economics`. London: Random House.

DOSI, G. & NELSON, R.R. 1994.  An Introduction to Evolutionary Theories in Economics. Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Vol. 4(3).

NELSON, R.R. 1995.  Co-evolution of industry structure, technology and supporting Institutions, and the making of comparitive advantage. International Journal of the Economics of Busienss, Vol. 2(2) pp:171-184.

RAMALINGHAM, B., JONES, H., REBA, T. & YOUNG, J. 2008. Exploring the science of complexity. Ideas and implications for development and humanitarian efforts.  Working Paper 285, London: Overseas Development Institute.

One Response to “Local economic development as an evolutionary process”

  1. Michael MEadon Says:

    Have you read Douglas North? His stuff is great. See his Nobel acceptance speech for some nice synthesis.

    Like


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